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Explore: The 2020 RMD Reversal Deadline Is Almost Here

The 2020 RMD Reversal Deadline Is Almost Here

Are you one of the many retirement account holders who took a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) this year? If so, you may want to consider reducing your income by paying back those distributions, as the requirement for taking them has been waived this year. There are some essential details to keep in mind, however. Here’s what you need to know. 

Don’t forget the withholding. Thanks to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, those who hold certain retirement accounts can bypass the RMDs for 2020. To do so, though, you’ll need to return the full amount of your RMD to your retirement account. Keep in mind that many retirement account custodians often withhold income tax, which will need to be returned as well—not just the net amount you receive.1 

Remember August 31st. August 31st is the deadline by which you must return your RMD. But considering the widespread disruption caused by COVID-19, it may be wise to begin this process sooner rather than later. If you’re not sure where to begin, our financial professionals can help.

Avoid the 6%. As many retirement account holders know, accidental excess contributions result in a 6% tax for every year the excess remains in the account. Considering the flurry of changes to the tax code this year, it may be worth checking with your custodian to make sure they have tagged your RMD reversal as a “return of funds.”1 

It pays to be sure. These are just some of the most important factors to keep in mind, but the longer you wait, the greater the potential for delay or mishap. In this case, it literally pays to work with our financial professionals to make sure your RMDs are returned correctly.1


Distributions from Traditional IRAs, 401(k) plans and most other employer-sponsored retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. The change in the RMD age requirement from 70½ to 72 only applies to individuals who turn 70½ on or after January 1, 2020. Once you reach age 72, you must begin taking required minimum distributions from your 401(k) or other defined contribution plan in most circumstances. Workers over 72 can still contribute to an IRA, 401(k) or other retirement accounts, depending on specific circumstances.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.


Citations

1. IRS.gov, 2020

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